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FAQ

Acorn

Allowance


Blackout lining


Colourway

Contrast binding

Corona

Curtain return


Dress curtain

Drop pattern


Eyelet heading



Finial

French Pleat

Finished length


Goblet


Half tester

Heading

Hold back

Hobbled                




Lambrequin

Leading edge

Loose lined


Ombra

Overlap

Overlong


Pencil pleat

Pattern repeat

Pelmet


Pelmet board

Penny weight

Pin hooks

Piping


Roller blind

Roman blind


Selvedge

Soffit

Stack back


Swags and tails



Tab top


Tester

Tie back

Track




Valence


Voile


Window recess

Here is an explanation of some of the terms used when discussing curtains and soft furnishings;


AcornA decorative end for blind cords.

AllowanceA measurement which has to be added in order to turn in the fabric neatly at the seams, hems or headings.


Blackout liningExactly what it says – lining which blocks out the light, often used in children’s rooms.


ColourwayOne of many combinations of colours which make up the pattern of a fabric.

Contrast bindingStrips of contrasting fabric sewn onto edges for decorative effect.

CoronaA semicircular fitting used to hang curtains above a bed.

Curtain returnThe outside edge which turns the corner from the face of the track to the wall.


Dress curtainAlso known as a ‘sham’ curtain. A curtain which is just for show, ie does not drawer across the window.

Drop patternThe measurement of a pattern which repeats itself diagonally across the width of the fabric.


Eyelet headingA curtain heading which involves rings being fixed into the top of the curtain and the pole passed through these rings.


FinialA round or pointed shape, screwed to a curtain pole at both ends to hold the rings in place.

French PleatAlso known as triple pleat or pinch pleat. A three part pleat constructed and stitched on a hand made heading.

Finished lengthThe length of the curtain when ready to hang.


GobletA round pleat created in hand made headings, stitched in place at the base to hold a shape which resembles a goblet.


Half testerA rectangular pelmet board or rail above a bed.

HeadingThe way the top of a curtain is finished, eg French Pleats.

Hold backA metal or wooden hook which is fixed to the wall and used in place of a tie-back, often in the same style as the curtain pole.

Hobbled                 A roman blind which has extra fabric in the length and is corded in a special way to maintain the folds when the blind is down, also known as a Cascade blind.


LambrequinA pelmet with deep sides.

Leading edgeThe edge of the curtain facing the centre of the window, as opposed to the outside edge.

Loose linedHas a detachable lining so that the curtain and the lining can be washed separately.


OmbraA decorative round fitting with a stem which can be fixed to the wall, used to hold curtains open in place of a tie-back.

OverlapExtra width to allow curtains to overlap avoiding draughty gaps.

OverlongExtra length to allow curtains to lie on the floor, also known as ‘puddling’.


Pencil pleatHeading created with commercial tape creating continuous regimented pleats, available in 2”, 3” etc

Pattern repeatThe length of the pattern before it repeats itself.

PelmetA fabric covered band of buckram or plywood which is fixed to the front edge of a pelmet board, it conceals the track and heading. This can be straight or shaped.

Pelmet boardA piece of planed timber fixed to the wall like a shelf, used to support the curtain track, pelmet etc.

Penny weightLead circular weight used to help curtains drape better.

Pin hooksSmall metal hooks that are stabbed into the back of hand made headings to attach the curtain to the track or pole.

PipingCord sandwiched inside a strip of fabric, often in a contrasting colour and inserted inside a seam.


Roller blindA flat treated fabric blind, raised and lowered by means of wrapping fabric round a sprung casing.

Roman blindA flat blind, raised and lowered by a set of cords which fold the fabric into neat horizontal folds.


SelvedgeThe woven side edges of fabric.

SoffitThe underside of the top of the window.

Stack backThe wall area at the side of the window which is covered by the curtain. The curtain ‘stacks back’ or folds into this area when opened.

Swags and tailsWindow dressing where individual swags are butted up to or overlap with tails of fabric on the outer edged of the window.


Tab topLoops of fabric, either the same or contrasting are sewn to the top of the curtain, This can only be used with curtain poles.

TesterA full canopy over a four poster bed.

Tie backFabric embrace to hold curtains back.

TrackA metal or plastic rail from which the curtains are hung on gliders. Curtains which are hung on uncorded tracks are pulled manually. Corded tracks are threaded with nylon cord at the back which connects to a system of pulleys, the curtains are drawn using a pull cord without having to handle the curtain.


ValenceA gathered band of fabric hung from the front edge of a pelmet board or valance rail. It hides the track and curtain heading and can be finished in a variety of ways.

VoileSheer fabric which is hung at a window to increase privacy, can be plain, patterned or coloured.


Window recessThe area inside the reveal of the window where blinds or sheer curtains can be fitted.

A decorative end for blind cords.

A measurement which has to be added in order to turn in the fabric neatly at the seams, hems or headings.


Exactly what it says – lining which blocks out the light, often used in children’s rooms.


One of many combinations of colours which make up the pattern of a fabric.

Strips of contrasting fabric sewn onto edges for decorative effect.

A semicircular fitting used to hang curtains above a bed.

The outside edge which turns the corner from the face of the track to the wall.


Also known as a ‘sham’ curtain. A curtain which is just for show, ie does not drawer across the window.

The measurement of a pattern which repeats itself diagonally across the width of the fabric.


A curtain heading which involves rings being fixed into the top of the curtain and the pole passed through these rings.


A round or pointed shape, screwed to a curtain pole at both ends to hold the rings in place.

Also known as triple pleat or pinch pleat. A three part pleat constructed and stitched on a hand made heading.

The length of the curtain when ready to hang.


A round pleat created in hand made headings, stitched in place at the base to hold a shape which resembles a goblet.


A rectangular pelmet board or rail above a bed.

The way the top of a curtain is finished, eg French Pleats.

A metal or wooden hook which is fixed to the wall and used in place of a tie-back, often in the same style as the curtain pole.

A roman blind which has extra fabric in the length and is corded in a special way to maintain the folds when the blind is down, also known as a Cascade blind.


A pelmet with deep sides.

The edge of the curtain facing the centre of the window, as opposed to the outside edge.

Has a detachable lining so that the curtain and the lining can be washed separately.


A decorative round fitting with a stem which can be fixed to the wall, used to hold curtains open in place of a tie-back.

Extra width to allow curtains to overlap avoiding draughty gaps.

Extra length to allow curtains to lie on the floor, also known as ‘puddling’.


Heading created with commercial tape creating continuous regimented pleats, available in 2”, 3” etc

The length of the pattern before it repeats itself.

A fabric covered band of buckram or plywood which is fixed to the front edge of a pelmet board, it conceals the track and heading. This can be straight or shaped.

A piece of planed timber fixed to the wall like a shelf, used to support the curtain track, pelmet etc.

Lead circular weight used to help curtains drape better.

Small metal hooks that are stabbed into the back of hand made headings to attach the curtain to the track or pole.

Cord sandwiched inside a strip of fabric, often in a contrasting colour and inserted inside a seam.


A flat treated fabric blind, raised and lowered by means of wrapping fabric round a sprung casing.

A flat blind, raised and lowered by a set of cords which fold the fabric into neat horizontal folds.


The woven side edges of fabric.

The underside of the top of the window.

The wall area at the side of the window which is covered by the curtain. The curtain ‘stacks back’ or folds into this area when opened.

Window dressing where individual swags are butted up to or overlap with tails of fabric on the outer edged of the window.



Loops of fabric, either the same or contrasting are sewn to the top of the curtain, This can only be used with curtain poles.


A full canopy over a four poster bed.

Fabric embrace to hold curtains back.

A metal or plastic rail from which the curtains are hung on gliders. Curtains which are hung on uncorded tracks are pulled manually. Corded tracks are threaded with nylon cord at the back which connects to a system of pulleys, the curtains are drawn using a pull cord without having to handle the curtain.


A gathered band of fabric hung from the front edge of a pelmet board or valance rail. It hides the track and curtain heading and can be finished in a variety of ways.

Sheer fabric which is hung at a window to increase privacy, can be plain, patterned or coloured.


The area inside the reveal of the window where blinds or sheer curtains can be fitted.